Pine Rosin

Pine rosin and other tree resins is a little more difficult to work with than the other biomaterials on this website. While the general principal is similar (heat material until liquid then cast into a mold) it is very different in that it is insoluble in water. You will learn this the hard way if you accidentally get any water in your mixture while it is heating (think hot oil and water). It is generally soluble in alcohol, but I actually prefer to work with it just on its own or with a little beeswax.

Ingredients

Metric

Equipment

  • double-walled boiler
  • silicone spatula

Preparation

  1. Weigh ingredients and add to double walled boiler
  2. Slowly heat resin and wax over medium-low heat. If the stovetop is too hot it may cause resin to smoke and be generally unpleasant.
  3. Once mixture has liquified, stir slowly with silicone spatula to combine. Incorporate any additives at this time, making sure to stir continually.
  4. Pour mixture into your mold, working quickly before the resin begins to harden.
  5. Pop any bubbles that form on the surface with a small butane torch or heat gun.

Pine rosin and other tree resins is a little more difficult to work with than the other biomaterials on this website. While the general principal is similar (heat material until liquid then cast into a mold) it is very different in that it is insoluble in water. You will learn this the hard way if you accidentally get any water in your mixture while it is heating (think hot oil and water). It is generally soluble in alcohol, but I actually prefer to work with it just on its own or with a little beeswax.

The key I've found to working with pine rosin is to use a double boiler. This will help your mixture not to smoke violently while heating, as well as protect your pots and pans from the thin layers of solidified rosin you will never be able to fully remove.

Contributor

Jessica Raynor

At A Glance

Preparation:
20 min
Overall Time:
25 min
Quantity:
120 g
Difficulty:
medium